What is the focus of 2020-21

The conclusion of this past school year due to COVID-19 virus and now the uncertainty for the 2020-21 school year is unlike anything educators have seen before. Things change daily, maybe even hourly, so planning is challenging to say the least. The impact this has upon educators is significant as they recognize the trust that society puts upon schools.  Educators not only care for children but help them learn skills and life lessons to prepare for their future. As this summer has started and progressed,  I did the only thing I knew how to do – learn, listen and get ready to apply concepts to the school community that I serve. My key learnings came from various books, blogs, podcasts and twitter chats. Each has shared different perspectives. While all are valuable , there are differences but they also come back to a common theme – the CULTURE of the organization is the most important thing.  As a result, here is my perspective on what to focus on for 2020-21. Specifically,  I share how  a leader can develop culture within their school community to set the foundation for a successful year.  

It is all about people 

I believe schools can do amazing things this year despite not having enough resources, being asked to change on a moment’s notice and dealing with many society impacts. It is important for leaders to remember that growing as a school community is not about “changing someone” but focusing on the “growth” of the staff member. This simply means that instead of focusing on what someone “cannot do or what they lack”,  I strive to  focus on “what skills they do have” and help them to excel in those areas. This puts a focus on finding value in each staff member and then empowering them in ways they can contribute to the school community.  When staff feel valued, they will be their best version of themself that can positively impact students and our families. I believe the single greatest indicator about the health of a school is the quality of the relationships of the people within it.  If the students, staff and parents feel an investment or purpose for the school, then they are willing to overcome any obstacle and stay together. It is even more important this year to still focus on how can we move forward as a school and that includes all stakeholders.

Create and sustain strong relationships

It is a true challenge to find the time to get around to every staff member and create strong  relationships at the beginning of a year.  It is important but challenging due to so many time constraints. The same can be said of the importance of connecting with students and families. This is always important but even more important since everyone has been away since March. This seems insurmountable when I think about the number of people I should strive to connect with. But I have learned that it is not the quantity of interactions that create the relationship, but rather the quality of those interactions and how authentic or real I am in the conversation.  As Susan Scott wrote in her book “Fierce Conversations”, “The conversation is the relationship”. I admit when I first read that idea I was unsure of how relatable that would be to leading a school. However, there are many topics that we will be visiting with staff, students and families about this year that will provide opportunities to reconnect and sustain the relationships. This includes the continuing impact of COVID, how our school continues to work on equity and creating an inclusive culture and then supporting teaching/learning during COVID.  This will not be easy conversations but important ones. To help ensure that I am listening and developing the relationship through the conversations, I will strive to:

  • Be present in the conversation (ex. do not look at the clock) and keep my eye and attention on that person and topic.
  • See the topic from their perspective and check for understanding.
  • Provide praise (if appropriate) to the person in an authentic way with specific examples.
  • Seek ideas on how they can help our school community and their level of investment moving forward.

These conversations cannot happen all the first week back, but it will start there.  They will continue throughout the year. I have reminded myself that when we are talking about building relationships, “It is better to go slow and build relationships built on trust.” This helps a leader during the critical conversations or ones that may be uneasy.  If everyone knows that all involved have the same common purpose, then we can work through the challenges together. It takes time to get to know people, but we must “know people to grow people” as it relates to our culture. 

Leaders set the tone 

I do believe that leaders include everyone within an organization, not just the administrators or teachers, but students and families too. However, it is also true that it’s human nature for people to notice what the “leaders” are doing and typically people will turn to the administrators first.  As a result, I remind myself I need to:

  • Model the behaviors that we want from everyone.
  • Show that it is okay to make mistakes and admit when I am wrong.
  • “Be the thermostat not the thermometer” – in other words it is important to be consistent, calm and purposeful with our work.
  • Empower others to lead and give them chances to grow within our culture.
  • Take care of the staff and show how much I appreciate their efforts. As Simon Sinek points out that “Yes, we want to develop leaders and from that we know that someday they may leave for greater leadership opportunities but it is also true that you should treat them so well that they do not want to leave”. Very well said!

Create learner centered learning environments

To help create our schools that are future focused and developing students with skills so they can be successful in any career, then as leaders we must Develop capacity within others to lead our schools (shared leadership). Our schools will be their best when all stakeholders take pride in creating inclusive learning environments and have opportunities to share, lead and create change. We use the approach of “fail forward” and give teachers permission to try new strategies or lessons that create higher engagement and skill development. During COVID, no matter the format of our school, we must give our teachers support for thinking outside the box and try new ways to connect with students to personalize learning. It is also important to get parents involved in our work so they have a better understanding of our purpose. Most importantly, leaders must “be a merchant of hope” for students, staff and families. To me, this simply means  to create meaningful ways for staff to remember the “why” they went into teaching and how they do influence kids on a daily basis. This will be needed to help our staff overcome the obstacles and challenges that will occur during this unprecedented time.

Communication is the key

This may be the most important part of uniting the school community during the upcoming year.   As I have learned from mistakes in previous years, every action I take (ex. every interaction, every decision and every expression on my face, tone in my voice and body language) conveys my thoughts/emotions to a person.  I will strive to be a good listener and set the tone with positivity. Furthermore,  these interactions either earn trust or erodes trust and it is up to me to communicate effectively.  For the challenge for the upcoming year, the communication must be:

  • Concise 
  • Real and authentic
  • Connect to the people
  • Relate back to our school’s purpose
  • Build culture 

In summary,  each summer I strive to think about how to best move our school forward for the upcoming year. This year is true like other years.  However, this year is unlike no other due to so many external factors and the constant unknowns. As a result,  as a leader I must adapt and understand what I must do differently to be the most effective leader for our school community. True leadership occurs by intentional efforts when you work extremely hard to improve your own learning and that leads to an improved school. I encourage all leaders to reflect upon your prior experiences as you planned for the coming school year. When you can self-analyze your past and what you learned from those experiences, it allows you to focus on spending the right efforts towards the important work of leading others. It is never too late to change or adapt to create something better. We owe that to our students and staff that we serve. Comment below or reach out to me at leadlearnerperspectives@gmail.com

Learn 

  Engage 

    Adapt 

       Delegate 

         Empower 

           Reflect  

             Serve 

What Leadership Lessons Being a Father Has Taught Me

 

man carrying her daughter smiling
Photo by Josh Willink on Pexels.com

 

As schools are on summer break or begin shortly, leaders now face the reality of next year and the COVID impact, racial tension and other challenges as well.  As I reflect on how I have led and will need to lead in the future to best support our school, I recognized many of the attributes I need to use I learned from prior experiences before becoming an administrator. With the upcoming Father’s Day approaching, I wanted to share how as a parent, and my perspective is that of a Father, has helped me become a better leader.  These experiences are not unique to me as other people may have similar viewpoints or even more to add to the conversation. 

When I graduated from college and began my teaching career I thought I understood what being an effective educator meant. Wow, was I wrong as I learned so much from the beginning years of my teaching experience. I remind myself of the quote “What we know now doesn’t make yesterday wrong, it makes tomorrow better”. I kept that phrase in mind when I began administration as I thought the experiences as a teacher leader would prepare me well for a leadership position. To some extent it did, but so much of leadership is character, attitude and how we connect with others.  These experiences I developed and enhanced to a greater extent when I became a parent. Specifically, being a Father helped me grow as a leader the following ways:

  1. Leadership begins with TrustAs a young parent I learned quickly how my children trusted me. They trusted me to guide them, care for them and be there for support.  How I did this was through sincere care (character) and consistency (competence). These same traits helped me to better serve our staff which in turn can care for our students. Our school communities turn to school leaders for guidance and they trust us to provide the direction their children need.
  2. Leaders set the ToneThere were many moments (and there still are) when as a dad I get tired and quite frankly, frustrated, with my children’s decisions. But I remind myself that they are finding their way, learning and experiencing things for the first time. My role as a father is to help be positive, help them reflect/learn and grow from those experiences. As a leader, I use this same mindset as our staff must adjust to COVID or as we grow in student centered instruction or blended learning. Change is constant; it’s how we grow through the experiences that count.
  3. Don’t be afraid to failAs a young parent I made many mistakes that now I can laugh at. From changing diapers, cooking more, playing house….endless memories. But each adventure I became better at simply because I was willing to try and found a better way. The same can be said for leaders….if we are willing to take risks and learn from those experiences then staff see that and are more likely to also take risks as the conditions for positive change are in place and are the norm.
  4. Adjust your leadership style if neededSome may argue being a parent is easier when the children are young. Others would say as they grow and become more independent a parent’s role is easier. I am not sure which is more accurate. But I do recognize that I had to adjust to my kids and what they needed as they grew in various stages of life. This is much like leadership…we must adjust to the needs of the school and those we serve. Each year has different challenges so the important thing is not just adjusting but as David Geurin shares, “Be Firm with your principles and flexible with your practices.” 
  5. Start by being a good follower and teammateI am fortunate as a father that I have a loving and supportive wife. She has provided the foundation for our family and supports me even when I make mistakes.  As a father, to help develop our family unit I recognized if I was supportive of my wife and was similar in how we expected things of our children then we could be better raising our children together.  As a leader, I remind myself often that “It’s not about being the best on the team, but the best for the team.”  We must support our district, other schools and district leaders so that our school works well within the school system as we connect and provide a quality K-12 school experience. 
  6. Develop other leadersA parent’s primary role is developing your children so they can lead productive, healthy, happy lives while developing independence.  As a school leader, I now recognize how important it is to develop other leaders as leadership is about influence and impact upon others. I now focus on intentional ways to inspire others, give them confidence to lead, and influence their thinking and behaviors that will lead to further positive changes for their growth and the school.  We are better together when everyone grows as learners. 

 

True leadership occurs by intentional efforts when you work extremely hard to improve your own learning and that leads to an improved school. I encourage all leaders to reflect upon your prior experiences as a parent or growing up and how those experiences have shaped you as a leader. When you can self-analyze your past and what you learned from those experiences, it allows you to focus on spending the right efforts towards the important work of leading others. It is never too late to change or adapt to create something better. We owe that to our students and staff that we serve. Comment below or reach out to me at leadlearnerperspectives@gmail.com

 

Learn 

  Engage 

    Adapt 

       Delegate 

         Empower 

           Reflect  

             Serve 

 

The Struggle and Feeling of Isolation of Leading a School Community

 

man with hand on temple looking at laptop
Photo by bruce mars on Pexels.com

The school year for students and staff has officially ended and I am in the midst of the summer work that building leaders typically do each year.  Like so many leaders, we faced numerous challenges this year including COVID-19 virus.  I should be proud of what our school community was able to accomplish and how we worked together to make this happen. The year was not perfect but we got better as a school and we provided great learning experiences for our students.  However, as I sit here and write this blog, my emotions and feelings of the year for me as the building leader truly are those of struggle and feeling of isolation.  These raw emotions are greater this year than before and I couldn’t pinpoint “why” until recently.  During the past few days, like so many schools, we had to distribute to our families their student belongings to them via curbside pickup. It just so happened this occurred in a driving rainstorm.  While the conditions were not ideal, the large amount of time this process took provided much reflection and gave me insight into why I feel this struggle and isolation. More importantly, I have self talked to myself and reinforced what I must remember or learn from these experiences to become a better version of myself moving forward.  I am determined to be better for these experiences, not bitter, and grow through the process.

Here are the reasons why I feel like as a building leader I struggle, feel isolated as a leader and then the solutions or learnings I have reflected upon to move forward.

Challenge – Losing Quality Staff 

Building leaders know that improving a school really comes down to improving your current staff and hiring quality people when there are openings. An area that I pride myself in is providing “leadership growth” experiences for our staff.  I have devoted numerous hours of my personal time making deep connections with staff, goals for staff who share the interest of leadership and work with them to provide authentic experiences within our school so they can develop as leaders. When one of these staff members shares “I need to move to another district or position for family reasons or financial reasons”, I feel a sense of pain and loss. This is due to the personal investment I put in of my time, energy and efforts to help them develop as a leader and now it is gone.  It hurts me emotionally and physically for a short time.  I also recognize filling the position with the right fit is never easy as the field of quality educators has dwindled in recent years, even more so in a pandemic.  This process happened again recently and these emotions were most real.  

Solution 

As I was processing this, I reminded myself that “developing others” is the best way to improve our school and the individual educator. It multiplies my impact upon our school community and even if it’s for a few years, that impact is much greater and broader upon our school than if I would have  tried to do the role of leading by myself.  I reminded myself that as a leader our greatest role is to help others and we cannot take it personally when staff must move to a new position. We need to be happy for them and we can continue to help impact their journey. It is part of the work and leaders must focus on developing people, so next person up!

 

Challenge – Solving Societal Challenges 

Schools have always been a place that is more than just academic learning but includes developing character, providing basic needs, supporting SEL and helping students/families have a place they feel safe/supported. It feels like this pressure for schools to be the ones to provide the support for all of society challenges has increased in recent years.  While this is extremely important for schools to do, I struggle with “how” when we have so many other demands upon our plate.  I recognize you cannot do everything and in fact, if you try to do too much you won’t accomplish anything at a high quality level.  But, where do you start and what do you start with?

Solution 

 As I reflected, I reminded myself that as a leader, the support of our families/staff starts with me.  I must take responsibility for those I serve, support and develop.  I will not say that I understand what it feels as many people in our country are hurting right now, but I can listen, try to see different perspectives and work with everyone to see how we can help our school community be a place of inclusivity,  value differences and provide equity for everyone in all aspects of our work. This is simply a starting point, but it is a start and I must be committed to the process and stay with the work so that everyone in our school community is heard and feels supported.

 

Challenge – Developing yourself as a leader among all other demands

As I shared earlier, the best way to improve your school is to make the staff better. But to do this, leaders must first improve themselves and this really takes intentional efforts with a focused vision on growth.  The challenge is how do you find the time to do this when you are already spending enormous amounts of time away from your family to simply do the job.  A famous saying goes “you cannot pour from an empty cup”.  As a leader, if you do not have time to feel energized, spend doing things you enjoy and find time to grow yourself then you cannot help others develop.  In addition, the challenge for many leaders, quite frankly, is they get caught up in the workload and get complacent and fall back to average as a leader. These are quality people who do care, they simply do not have awareness that growing as a leader is the most important part of their work. Over time, the management part of a school leader takes more of a priority over the leadership aspect. The leader gets stagnant and the school community plateaus as far as innovation. As a result, leading a school and growing as a leader is very isolating as it’s hard to find those like minded innovative leaders.  As a result, the burnout rate of school leaders is very high and most principals only last for a few years in a school.  

 

Solution 

Recognizing the value of your growth is most important to help others develop as educators and that you must operate by core values to guide your work.  How a person grows over time is simply by being consistent.  Yes, it’s that simple – consistency. If someone is willing to devote a few hours a week to reading, connecting with others, reflecting upon their work, then they will grow as a leader over time.  This takes an investment on your part and understanding the process is most important. As you learn, it’s important to find your core values or principles that guide your decision making as a leader.  This helps to keep the focus on the right work, not necessarily doing the right things which is the managerial side of leadership.  As you develop the core values then you can apply those to the staff you serve.  Remember, true leadership is how you can apply your learnings to help influence others.  I have been so fortunate to connect with other like minded leaders through Social media, within my district and other avenues that have been there to lift me up and to show me that there is a better way. This “better way” is by working with others and being relentless to find your tribe of like minded leaders and staying with them as you push each other towards greatness.  

 

Challenge – Never feeling that my best is good enough

Perhaps it is my own insecurities or my desire to grow as a leader, but I have found many times over the years that I feel that I am not doing my job well enough.  No one has said this, but it is how I feel. It probably doesn’t help as I see on social media where other leaders get applauded for work that we do as well but because they are within the right system or know the right people (my perceptions) they get the validation.  This creates a sense of frustration and is in part why I think so many leaders burn out and leave the profession or the position.  Everyone wants to be validated and if they do not get that support or appreciation, many leave or stop growing. They fall back to average.

Solution

I have tried to remind myself that I and other educators didn’t go into our work for the income or the awards but the outcome (helping people). I also remind myself that leading hard work is worthwhile, but it will feel like you are “running uphill” all the time as it’s constant work and struggle.  But that is what makes it great – seeing how you can transform an average school setting into something positive for kids and great for everyone involved. In addition, I recognize that many people rarely just sit down and tell those they serve “I am proud of you”. So I asked myself “why should I not start that trend”?  I recently did this with our teachers and in addition to writing hand written notes of appreciation. I think it made those staff and educators feel empowered, proud and positive. It also helped me gain a sense of pride, feel energized and reminded me of my purpose. I didn’t wait for someone to come to me, I went to those I serve and shared my appreciation as I wanted to make sure they knew how much I valued them. I have reminded myself that “the position doesn’t make the leader, the leader makes the position”. Each person has the opportunity to positively influence others and it is up to each of us what we do with that possibility.

 

True leadership occurs by intentional efforts when you work extremely hard to improve your own learning and that leads to an improved school.  I would be curious about your thoughts of leading others or a school community and the struggles and feeling of isolation that occurs with that work and how you have overcome those challenges.

It is never too late to change or adapt to create something better. We owe that to our students and staff that we serve. Comment below or reach out to me so we can learn together and create a better and brighter future at leadlearnerperspectives@gmail.com

Learn 

  Engage 

    Adapt 

       Delegate 

         Empower 

           Reflect  

             Serve 

 

How do you prepare to lead for an unpredictable future

challenges-2

Leading schools during this springtime of the COVID-19 virus has been challenging for school leaders on many levels.  Despite the uncertainty, fear, and upheaval the pandemic has caused in our society; educators have rallied and found many ways to continue to positively impact students and help them in ways that extend far beyond the learning experience. This includes providing food, basic necessities and some sense of normalcy.  Educators should be proud of their efforts and a contribution to our society’s work to come together.

During this time there also have been many questions posed to school leaders about “what does next year look like?”  This is a question that is most challenging to answer right now. First, the situation changes daily and schools must always follow the guidelines of the health organizations.  So planning for an unpredictable future is the challenge on many minds of school leaders. In this blog post we discuss “how do you prepare to lead for an unpredictable future”

Here are some key areas leaders can focus on that allows them to be intentional with their efforts and support the work moving forward

  1. Humility and Grace – Leaders should be proud of the work they have done during COVID-19 with their school community. To help prepare to lead those you serve, we must be humble and not put ourselves at the center of the thinking but rather focus on those we serve – what are their needs, what supports will they ask for and how can we connect with each other. As John Maxwell has shared, the definition of humility is “not thinking less of yourself but thinking of yourself less”. In other words, leaders must focus on the needs of the students and teachers and what best practices can be used to support their work.  At the same time, it is important to give yourself grace as you will not have all the answers and that is okay.  The key is not having all the answers but developing the right questions that will develop solutions for those we serve to be put in positions of success.

        2. Be Flexible and adaptable – The pandemic changes the situation within our  county, state and country daily. Where you live will also impact how the pandemic impacts you to different levels. While it is important to prepare to best lead others, we must be ready for changes and when they happen, then embrace them.  Our mindset of how we handle adversity is critical to support and lead others as they will look to you for guidance.  Adaptability is one of the most essential skills for our times and leaders must model this for others. To be adaptable, keep your core values or principles in mind and model the way for others.  When we connect with others and lead with our core then others will trust our actions and that will allow the pivot to be effective if significant adaptations must occur.

3. Connect with others and have conversations – No single person has this figured out.  It is just not possible. As a result, the best way to learn nuggets of leadership and then apply to those you serve is to connect with others, listen, ask questions and see what can be applied to your thinking to lead your organization. The medium or methods you use to connect to others may vary but remember that who you spend the majority of your time with will determine in many ways your rate of growth – so find ways to connect with those that will challenge your thinking, give different perspectives and accelerate your rate of growth. Be a learner, a listener and understand everyone has something of value to share.

4. Importance of Reflection and then Action – When you think of all great leaders there are a few common traits that they share. One of these is the importance they place on reflection.  They use this to learn from their experiences, understand their mistakes/blindspots and then adjust for greater growth.  Reflecting alone is important but it will not move the needle. Most important part of this process is then putting that learning from the reflection into practice by action.  Hope doesn’t create change, action does.  Leaders understand the importance of innovation or trying something new to create better results and they are willing to take that risk.

Listed below are some previous blog posts I have written on the importance of reflection that I wanted to share:

Growth Through Reflective Questions (previous blog post)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1iahlNh4l2I6OYs7ewu5QnM2DL0cVAps-pKkCWyAhbpA/edit?usp=sharing

Previous blog post on sharing failures and the learning from those experiences and all previous blog posts can be found at

https://leadlearnerperspectives.com/

True leadership occurs by intentional efforts when you work extremely hard to improve your own learning and that leads to an improved school. I encourage all leaders to think about how they can grow from this process and become better and then apply that moving forward.  Using the items mentioned above will allow you to put those you serve in a position of success.  By reflecting upon “How do you prepare to lead for an unpredictable future”, you can self-analyze if you are spending efforts towards the important and right work during COVID-19. It is never too late to change or adapt to create something better. We owe that to our students and staff that we serve. Comment below or reach out to me at leadlearnerperspectives@gmail.com

Learn 

  Engage 

    Adapt 

       Delegate 

         Empower 

           Reflect  

             Serve 

 

The Struggle is Real – what I learned from Failures

 

focused businessman taking notes at home
Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Like many educators, the COVID-19 virus has caused a disruption to normal routine, work and our society. Everyone has had to adjust and for me, this has included leading the work of a school.  As we near the end of the school year, I have had many thoughts of “what this year could have been”. The positive start in August, hard work and collective efforts of so many was halted overnight. It has caused me great struggle as the focus of our work has been stopped as a result of the quarantine.  This struggle has led to frustration, self-doubt and even despair on my part.  Sharing this with you is a risk, but it is the honest assessment of how I felt at different points in recent weeks. 

This raw emotion has occurred as I remind myself I still must lead the staff I serve, our instructional work and our school community.  Others depend upon me, both professionally and personally.  It has been challenging and over the course of the 6-8 weeks of quarantine, at times, to be honest it has felt defeating.  But with renewed purpose and vigor, I have learned how to navigate through this struggle and move forward to a better future that I can control.  These challenges have taught me to recognize “the struggle is real” and “what I have learned from failures”. In this blog post I want to share some of the struggles and my learnings as a hope to you that we have much in common and the more we learn from and with each other, then the better we can each fulfill our happiness and grow as  leaders. As I remind myself, “we all have failures and those failures don’t define us, they refine us.”

What are the struggles

When a person has a struggle it is human nature to have self doubt and ask questions. Personally, this struggle impacted me in the following ways:

  • I started to believe that our work no longer had a purpose

 

  • I lost sight of the most important part of my work, which is taking care of others and helping them through the same struggles that I was facing.
  • I lost a balance between my personal and professional life by not finding enough time for self care and time to find inner peace.
  • I needed to find time for my professional growth of reading, listening and learning from others but was too busy to find this important part of each day.
  • I lost sight of the most important part of each day is what is happening right then, right in front of me.

 

After much reflection and many long walks and exercising opportunities, I did some deep thinking and made some very real observations. I recognized I was being impacted by so many things that were outside of my control. This included the negativity in some social media and other sources, the demands that I felt were “all upon my shoulders were my sole responsibility” and that I had to have all the answers.  In short, I kept looking back at “why did this happen” where instead I should have been looking forward to “how can we grow from this experience and be better (not bitter)”. From these failures that I had, I learned some pivotal reminders that all learners, especially leaders, must remember and model in their daily life. 

What I learned from the failures

 

  • Give yourself grace, be okay with not knowing the answer but asking the right questions.
  • Don’t be bitter due to the situation but focus on getting better which starts with my mindset.
  • Be intentional on what I can control and where I place my time through my efforts, actions and behaviors.
  • Show others gratitude through real appreciation and help them feel valued; this will give me significance and help drive the “why” or purpose of our work.
  • Focus on the “here and now” by seizing the moment and make each day the best day.
  • When others are upset towards me for things outside of my control and  “go low” and use negativity, then  I should “go high”, be positive, and remain optimistic.

 

By refocusing on the right work which is to Serve – Lead – Inspire, I was able to “right the ship” and start growing as a person and leader during quarantine.  I had to adjust, and as a leader,  transfer my passion, optimism and beliefs to those we work with.  I recognized my greatest daily impact would be  creating the positive environment and the conditions where positive change could occur. Ultimately,  this is what so many educators are seeking during this time – leadership by example. An  important part of leadership is action.  True leadership occurs by intentional efforts when you work extremely hard to improve your own learning and that leads to an improved school. By reflecting upon “The Struggle is Real – What I learned from failures”, you can self-analyze if you are spending efforts towards the important and right work during COVID-19. It is never too late to change or adapt to create something better. We owe that to our students and staff that we serve. Comment below or reach out to me at leadlearnerperspectives@gmail.com

Learn 

  Engage 

    Adapt 

       Delegate 

         Empower 

           Reflect  

             Serve 

 

The Focus of Leaders During a Crisis

person taking photo in sunset
Photo by Chei ki on Pexels.com

We are in uncharted waters and during challenging times….people look towards those who have the titles or those in charge.  They want someone to follow or believe in. For educators, as we know, everyone is a leader and so the possibility to have a spark to help those around us has great potential as there are many great educators who can provide that foundation.

In this blog post we focus on what is “The Focus of A Leader During A Crisis” that helps to support the people they serve and how they move their organization forward. It is important to note that during a crisis, change is constant. The COVID-19 crisis will change you and your school community. Also, typically a crisis will start with negative impacts. The challenge for a leader is how do they shift that to a positive impact by supporting others, providing hope, connections and strategies to grow from this experience. As George Cuoros shares, “Change is the opportunity to do something amazing”. 

Here are key areas that reflect “The Focus Of Leaders During a Crisis”

 

  1. Leaders have Situational Awareness – This simply means that leaders understand the importance of anticipating possible questions/issues, being transparent with those they serve and adapting to the needs of others.  Since change is constant in a crisis, this requires leaders to continually reflect, think and be working ahead about potential impacts and the solutions that would be needed to help others.

 

 2. Leaders remember it’s about serving people – Leaders recognize they must help others feel supported, reduce their fear and help them feel valued for their efforts. It may be a virtual check in, handwritten notes in the mail, a phone call or even sharing a personal story of struggle-resilience and then success.  They know their people and how to help them stay connected and focused on moving forward.

 

 

3. Leaders communicate effectively – Communication is always important for a leader but even more so during a crisis.  People need clarity, transparency and consistent messaging.  Leaders need to also remind their people that change happens so leadership may adapt as well. In other words, “how I lead today may be different than how I lead tomorrow”.  When leaders lead with humility it also helps those they serve to feel a stronger sense of togetherness and connection. 

 

 

4. Leaders lead with humility – As you recognize, people don’t buy into a vision, they follow the person first. This is paramount during a crisis. It is essential that leaders recognize they must connect with others in order for others to stay focused and follow the specifics. Leading with vulnerability and admitting we may not have all the answers but we are willing to work hard, lead our school and seek the input from others then it helps everyone to feel a sense of belonging .  

 

 

5. Leaders focus on constructive change – A crisis will make everyone change and may cause significant adaptations to not only how schools operate but our way of life. As stated previously, we can either “go through an experience or grow through it”.  Leaders use the above mentioned traits to help others and lead effectively by embracing technology, being creative to innovate new solutions and getting input from others.  By using this mindset, leaders help their organization to actually develop and grow as a result of a crisis. It makes the system better, more agile and more united on the purpose of supporting others and meeting the needs of students.  Leaders consistently remind themselves and others that we must focus on what we can control and focus our time, energy and resources on moving from what we were comfortable with to a pursuit of an unknown better. They challenge the status quo and take risk but in a way to help drive the school organization and others towards greater excellence.

 

An  important part of leadership is action.  True leadership occurs by intentional efforts when you work extremely hard to improve your own learning and that leads to an improved school. By reflecting upon “The Focus of Leaders during a Crisis”, you can self-analyze if you are spending  efforts towards the important and right work during COVID-19. It is never too late to change or adapt to create something better. We owe that to our students and staff that we serve. Comment below or reach out to me at leadlearnerperspectives@gmail.com

Learn 

  Engage 

    Adapt 

       Delegate 

         Empower 

           Reflect  

             Serve 

 

How do you learn from great leaders?

man wearing black polo shirt and gray pants sitting on white chair
Photo by nappy on Pexels.com

       During everyone’s journey in their professional career you will work with and come across many people.  Most are caring, supportive and truly good people. Some may even be lifelong learners. If you are fortunate, a few are leaders that develop other people/organizations and strive for excellence.  In those instances, learning from great leaders and their experiences is one of the greatest gifts someone can be given. In this blog we discuss “How Do You Learn From Great Leaders” so not only are you developing but learning from your mentor or leaders beyond just knowing them.

       First it is important to know that everyone has opportunities to grow, learn and develop. It is a choice, a mindset and a passion to strive for excellence. This occurs daily and growth occurs more often from failures than successes. As a result of their reflection and passion to succeed, leaders themselves learn new skills and practices by:

  1. ResourcesThis would include learning from books, social media like Twitter, FB and podcasts. Many leaders pursue these resources daily to stretch their thinking and strive to improve.

  2. Experiences  – The experiences that leaders go through provide learning opportunities and activities where they apply their thinking.  They also then reflect upon those experiences for greater motivation and learning opportunities.

  3. Learning from other people Most leaders started like other typical professionals with a desire to do their best. While most people fall back to average over time, some are fortunate to have Mentors and as a result, they learn from other people. This is important as the mentors or leaders demonstrate the actions and behaviors of leadership. The individual also has the opportunity to not only observe what they model but ask the right questions to learn from their perspective.

We will focus on what types of things should you ask your mentor or leaders.  This allows the greatest gain and insight that leads to deeper conversations and growth in learning.

Here are the Questions to ask a leader/mentor you work with:

    1. What are your passions that you spend your time on?

      This insight will allow you to see most leaders have passions that show a work/life balance and keep them grounded. Also, you will notice that they have a focus and are intentional with their time.

    2. How has failure shaped you?

        This will allow you to remember that most often people fail, not succeed, but from these failures is the greatest opportunity for growth. Please recognize that “Failures do not define you, they refine you.” It is how the leaders respond from the failures that allows insight into their skill set and why they are successful. Hearing their experiences will show you how leaders are vulnerable and willing to admit failures but they view that as a learning opportunity.

    3. Who do you know as a leader that I should connect with?

      This will show you why being connected is so vital as everyone learns from  others. This may broaden your network as well.

               4. What experiences as a leader do you suggest that I also consider as a way  to build leadership experience

In this question, it is important to not focus on the title but what the experience provided for the person.  In other words, specific jobs have different tasks but typically revolve around leadership traits like Leading people, making decisions, and communication.  Focus on how those experiences developed the skills they learned and now demonstrate.  

 

 5. How did you develop others and express gratitude to others? 

Developing others is the backbone of leadership and learning how they developed their employees lends new ideas, different perspectives and shows how they appreciated their employees by adding value to their work.

 

6. What are your core values that you have used to guide your professional work and how did you arrive at those

All leaders have core values that guide their work and is their compass they use to make the hard decisions.  Those conversations will help further lend you perspective and allow you to refine your core values that fit your style of leadership

Most important part is to remember that leadership is connecting with others and communication is part of this.  The more you can understand how a leader communicates and fires others up then that will give you greater perspective. Remember that in order to develop and influence people, you must connect with them. The greater your ability to communicate and connect with others then you have a greater chance to influence others.  Learning from leaders is a great opportunity that no one should pass up without having a conversation with them to learn and develop oneself. True leadership occurs by intentional efforts when you work extremely hard to improve your own learning and that leads to an improved school. By reflecting upon “How do you learn from Great Leaders”, you can self-analyze if you are spending  efforts towards the important and right work. It is never too late to change or adapt to create something better. We owe that to our students and staff that we serve. Comment below or reach out to me at leadlearnerperspectives@gmail.com

Learn 

  Engage 

    Adapt 

       Delegate 

         Empower 

           Reflect  

             Serve 

During complex times, simple is best

 

green leaf in close up photography
Photo by MD ARIF on Pexels.com 

These times for educators are extremely busy but also new situations that have never been faced. To say it has been challenging is an understatement. It is a collaborative effort on everyone’s behalf and requires a concentrated focus.  Leaders understand there will be many things that come up that they will need to problem solve as everyone moves forward in this process. 

Leaders not only are leading during unprecedented times but also trying to work on the normal school challenges (ex. Budget, hiring,) as they complete this school year and plan for next school year.  This blog post focuses on what leaders do to remain effective and actually move their schools forward. As I reflected upon my experiences and connecting with my PLN (Professional Learning Network), it is best practice “during complex times, that simple is the best.”  Let’s analyze what this means and how leaders continue to remain effective during this new normal.

 

  1. It is all about people

 

The longer I am in education, I am reminded it always comes back to people. It comes back to how your staff supports one another, how staff will reach out to support families and how you, as their leader, will encourage and help each staff member feel valued.  I have come to realize that it is important to focus not on “changing someone” to fit a certain desired way (ex. Everyone must use Online learning videos) but focusing on the “growth” of the staff member. This simply means that I now focus on “what skills they do have” and “what are they passionate about” so I can help them to excel in those areas. This has led me to the concept of finding value in each staff member and finding ways how that person can contribute to our culture in this new normal. 

 

2. Positive Culture 

 

I believe that single greatest indicator about the health of a school is the quality of the relationships of the people within it.  This always comes back to creating a positive climate that builds trust, and ultimately, it builds culture. As leaders, find ways to intentionally reach out to staff and share your appreciation for their efforts. An authentic text message, email or handwritten note card mailed to a staff member can help lift their spirits. Likewise, great cultures are driven by passionate people so leaders must be creative during online learning on how do you still build teamwork. Our school created virtual “team builders or happy hours” on Fridays at 3:30 where we did things like Kahoot, Pear Deck activities on things like trivia, name that tune etc… These activities allowed our staff to further connect while in isolation to still come together to unite as a school team. Best of all, it was led by staff for staff. 

 

3. Leaders set the tone 

Model the behaviors that you want in the school community . Be vulnerable and be willing to take risks. If we don’t, why should others. For example, the most important thing we wanted for our kids and families was to know we cared for them, that we missed them and that we are here for them moving forward. I made a video that was very authentic, from the heart and sent it to our kids and families. I shared this with our teachers so they could see that it was okay that it was not perfect but it was real and authentic. Our staff appreciated this and they followed suit and many made similar videos that had great impact supporting our families. In the same instance, people will be stressed as this is all new. Leaders must “Be the thermostat not the thermometer” by being consistent, calm and purposeful with our work. In addition, giving grace to people and being empathetic is essential to supporting your people and setting the tone.

 

 

4. Communication is the key

A critical part of this new normal is the communication from leaders. Staff and families need proactive communication but also clear and consistent messaging.  Leaders must be purposeful with their communication, and timely in their delivery. Keep the concepts to the point but also positive and relate it to the families in several mediums (ex. Videos, smores, email) so it reaches everyone at their own comfort level. As you communicate to families about specific concepts, it is important to emphasize  calm, patience and positive. Help everyone remember that we are better together.

True leadership occurs by intentional efforts when leaders work extremely hard to improve their own learning and that leads to an improved school. By reflecting upon these challenging times and remembering that simple is best, leaders can continue to support staff and families and move their schools forward. It is never too late to change or adapt to create something better. We owe that to our students and staff that we serve. Comment below or reach out to me at

leadlearnerperspectives@gmail.com

Learn

       Engage

                 Adapt

                       Delegate

                                Empower

                                          Reflect

                                                  Serve

 

What separates leaders moving from good to great?

 

photography of long road
Photo by Brett Sayles on Pexels.com

 

Every educator that goes into the field has the aspiration to be great and make a difference. I truly believe this concept. However, over time many educators become stagnant, settle for what has worked in the past and fall back to average. This is not anyone’s fault – it is the result of being in a challenging field that is constantly changing, having many demands put on their plate and trying to find a balance between their work and personal life. In fact, many educators reach a plateau after years 2-3 in the profession where they no longer have the same goals as they once did, as a student teacher entering their first professional job. They settle for being “good”.

As a leader, our role includes supporting others, providing feedback and helping to develop excellence in each employee. To do this, leaders must be intentional with their work and understand it is not about the leader per say, but about how they can develop others and help them to maximize their role as an educator. When each employee is focused on growth and moves their growth “from their own Point A to Point B”, then leaders have created the conditions where the employees are focused on excellence and students are thriving as learners. As we take a deeper look into leadership, the following aspects are what separate those educators that are growing in their work versus those that show up and just do the job. In other words, what “characteristics separate leaders moving from good to great”. The following attributes are common in educators that are growing in their roles and continue to have positive impact upon others:

  1. Passion 

Passion. This trait may be the most important for any educator to have in their career. If someone has the passion to continue to learn the strategies, read new research and reflect upon their work then they will grow over time.  You can spot someone who has passion as they care more, give more effort and work harder than others. That is passion and it can be found in any career but in education if you have a passionate educator then you will find someone who makes others better and continually improves in their craft. They bring it daily and their positivity and drive is contagious.  If you have a passionate educator, their impact is magnified and helps to make others better.

2. Connect with others 

Educators who grow into impactful and great leaders recognize the importance of connecting with others. They recognize that they do not know it all – they are vulnerable and have a willingness to admit that they can learn from others. The mantra “focus on doing the right work, not doing things right” reflects these educators as part of doing the right things is connecting with other like minded educators. This stretches their thinking, allows shared ideas and provides different perspectives which challenges their status quo. This is how someone grows over time – by learning with and from others.

3. Seek Feedback and Reflect

As educators progress in their careers many work hard, in fact they work extremely hard. They also have a desire to get better.   However, just because someone works hard does not mean they will improve. In fact, if someone works hard in isolation in many instances it may lead to frustration and burn out as there is no support, feedback and encouragement. It is vital that educators do seek feedback and reflect – both individually but also with the help from others. This is why being connected to other like minded educators is so important. When we seek feedback from those we serve, it helps us to see our blindspots. But just as important, it allows us to validate the importance of others and helps the individual to recognize how they can make those they serve better. This amplifies the impact of an educator.  The reflection is a necessity for any growth to occur as it allows someone to see what went well, how to adjust and areas of strengths but also areas of deficit. This awareness allows more intentional work to occur that over time will lead to greater impact.

4. Staying Humble

As educators improve and increase their significance, it is vital they stay Humble. This allows the individual to remember:

  • They do not know it all and must be a lifelong learner
  • See others as someone they can learn from 
  • Be open to new ideas that may lead to greater impact
  • As Author Jon Gordon shares, being humble “doesn’t mean you think less of yourself, it means you think of yourself less.”  In other words, it helps the person to remember that true leadership is about impact upon others.

5. Focus 

Any educator will have setbacks or tough moments. It is important for leaders to have a Focus as that allows them to tune out the negatives and stay positive in those instances. In fact, leaders learn the most from times when there are setbacks as they reflect and adjust their work.  There will be negative people out there who do not like change or asked to do something different for the betterment of kids. This is when leaders must tune out the distractions and stay focused on the right work of developing self that allows them to develop others. This can only happen when there is a focus to the work that revolves about Core Values, emphasis placed on significance of moments/experiences rather than being right and creating the conditions for the individual and others for positive change.  

        True leadership occurs by intentional efforts when leaders work extremely hard to to improve their own learning and that leads to an improved school. By reflecting upon your impact as a leader and how you develop others then you can gain more insight on how you can move from good to great as a leader.  It is never too late to change or adapt to create something better.  We owe that to our students and staff that we serve.

Comment below or reach out to me at leadlearnerperspectives@gmail.com

 

Learn 

  Engage 

    Adapt 

       Delegate 

         Empower 

           Reflect  

             Serve 

Adversity brings leadership to the surface

challenges-2

Our education system, country and world are in unprecedented times due to the COVID-19 virus.  Leaders of schools are facing challenges that rarely have even been discussed in graduate classes or conversations that started “what if”, yet alone in the current reality. But it is real…very real and close to everyone’s homes. During these trying times it reminds us that our ultimate responsibility is not just as an educator or a leader but rather as a human being.  It is our moral responsibility to follow the guidelines of our health department, leadership and make responsible choices as our behaviors may impact others.  It is during adversity, that leadership comes to the surface.

As we are in this change in our society, the adversity of the situation has forced numerous decisions by leaders. I am not judging anyone’s decisions as they have had to make tough decisions that impact lives. I respect their decisions and how they have had to weigh so many factors into decisions. What I have noticed from school leaders is how their leadership has surfaced during adversity and reminds me the importance of strong leaders and the impact they have leading organizations.  Their leadership helps guide many into a pathway towards success.

The following traits are areas that I have noticed school leaders demonstrate as they make tough situations.

 

  1. Operate from core values 

 

When leaders must make the tough decisions regarding schools, they are thinking of the most important thing – people.  Yes, that is the ultimate guide when making tough decisions – how does the current situation impact the safety of the students, staff and families.  There are many things to consider when making decisions, but knowing that people are our primary concern it provides a guiding force to always refer to and make sure is our “north star”.

 

   2.  Make well-informed decisions

 

In today’s social media age, it is very difficult to know what information is correct and which is not accurate but rather an individual’s opinion.  Leadership is marked not by how we respond when we know what to do, but rather how we respond and behave when we don’t know what to do. Leaders bring a sense of assurance to the constantly changing situation and give people confidence that all will be fine. Leaders gather the facts from credible sources and consider all perspectives to make the right decisions.

 

    3. Make decisions part of collective group

 

A leader has great judgement and understands the “100,00 foot viewpoint” of their school or district.”  However, this situation is one that we have never had to even consider in our modern age, so it is wise that leaders make well informed decisions that are part of a larger collective.  It reminds me of the quote, “the smartest person in the room, is the room.” Leaders recognize this is not the time to be right, but rather most important to make the right decisions and sometimes that means asking for help, seeking guidance and learning with others. 

 

    4. Model how you want others to behave and operate 

 

Our current situation is one that is still changing and evolving, so we are not sure of the end result. What we do know is that it never helps if leaders are panicked, are unstable and demonstrate poor behaviors. What does help everyone is when leaders remain steadfast, calm, positive and provide a reassurance that they have everyone’s best interest at heart.  It comes down to taking care of people and that means leaders must connect with people with clear and authentic communication.  

 

True leadership occurs by intentional efforts when leaders work extremely hard to to improve their own learning and that leads to an improved school. All leaders will experience failures, challenging situations and adversity. The leaders that operate from core values demonstrate excellence and many qualities during the challenging times that reassure others that they will be okay and that together, we will move through this challenge and come out on the other side better for it. It is never too late to change or adapt to create something better.  We owe that to our students and staff that we serve.

 

Comment below or reach out to me at leadlearnerperspectives@gmail.com

 

Learn 

  Engage 

    Adapt 

       Delegate 

         Empower 

           Reflect  

             Serve